Paphos Arcæological Park

Paphos is a town in the south-west corner of Cyprus, and the site of a remarkable complex of building remains from prehistoric times to the Middle Ages. Most of what has been revealed at the still largely unexcavated site dates from the period of the Roman Empire. Pafos (Kato Pafos) is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, having been incribed on the list in 1980.

This mosaic is in a ruin called House of Theseus. It depicts the Greek hero Theseus, brandishing a club, slaying the Minotaur. The House of Theseus was a large villa, built in the second half of the 2nd century A.D., and was the home of the Roman proconsul or governor. It is remarkable that a mosaic so large has survived largely intact for so long. We’re lucky that the life and artistry of Paphos from two millenia ago can be revealed to us through a lost and found mosaic.

St. Hilarion Castle

St. Hilarion Castle seems to grow out of the rock of the Kyrenian Mountains in northern Cyprus. A monastery and a church was first built here in the 10th century. What you see today is mostly the castle built to defend the coast from Arab pirates, as improvided by the Lusignan rulers of Cyprus. The prominent tower in the middle of the photo is Prince John’s Tower, named after a Lusignan ruler who fought a four year war against the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II for control of Cyprus. In the end, Prince John lost and Cyprus was annexed by the Kingdom of Venice.

Ruins of the Ancient City of Salamis

Salamis dates from the 11th century B.C.. The ruins that can be seen today date mostly from the period of the Roman Empire. These are the remains of the theatre, that once was able to seat 15,000 people.

Salamis is near Famagusta on the east coast of Cyprus. It is now in territory of the unrecognized Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus.

The theatre and the complex of the gymasium and baths are the most well-preserved ruins at Salamis. In this photo you see a courtyard with columns, with the sweating rooms and cooling rooms beyond. Swimming pools are to either side. The Romans were living better two thousand years ago than many people are today.

Larnaca, Cyprus

It’s the off-season in Cyprus. That means the tourist hoardes haven’t yet arrived, and more of the place itself and its people show their true character. So far, Larnaca, Cyprus lives up to its reputation as a laid-back small city.

This is the Church of Saint Lazarus in Larnaca. It’s a Greek Orthodox church, founded in the 9th century. The reputed burial place of Lazarus – his second burial, of course! – was discovered on this spot in 890, and the church built over it. Most of the relics of Lazarus were removed to Constantinople, but some remain in the church in Larnaca. The church architecture is a mix of Byzantine, Gothic, Baroque, and Rococo style, as befits an edifice constructed over a period of a thousand years.

Winterlude 2018

Riduau Canal Skateway 2018The Winterlude festival is on now in Ottawa. The 2018 edition is the 40th. I used to think that Winterlude was just about the canal ice conditions getting very good for my skate to and from Carleton University, when I was a student there. Now, it’s a whole lot more. It has become a tradition to check out the ice sculptures in Confederation Park, and now Winterlude has become a stop on the international ice sculpture competition circuit.

Here’s a view of the canal, which is called the Rideau Canal Skateway when it’s flooded and maintained for skating along its length from the Rideau Locks near the Parliament Buildings to Hartwell’s Locks near Carleton University. That’s 7.8 kilometres of skating in one direction (more, if you skate around Dow’s Lake). The tourist bumf calls it the world’s largest skating rink. I took this picture from the Mackenzie King Bridge. The hut on the ice where people are queuing and lacing up skates is where you can rent skates and sleds. Skate rental is for folks “from away” – whether they use them or not, every Ottawan owns a pair of skates! Farther along, spanning the canal, is the Laurier Avenue Bridge, which opened in 1900. It’s been modernized this century, but the original iron arches are distinctive in green. The Cartier Square Drill Hall is unmistakable beyond and to the right of the Laurier Avenue Bridge. It was built in 1879. Ottawa men signed up for Canadian expeditionary forces fighting in the Boer War, the First World War, and the Second World War from this drill hall. The Governor General’s Foot Guards and the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa are based at the Cartier Square Drill Hall. During the summer, they march from here to Parliament Hill in their red tunics and bearskin caps. Taking pictures of the changing of the guard ceremony is a highlight of the trip for visitors.

The Rideau Canal Skateway is a big part of Ottawa life in the winter. All Canadians talk about the weather – probably too much – but when Ottawans do we include a canal ice conditions report. On my skating commute to work in the morning, when I walk to the office carrying my skates I’m often asked, “How’s the canal?” Skating on the canal is a small town aspect to city life. Have fun at Winterlude!

Canada 150 Rink

Canada 150 rinkThe Canada 150 celebrations are over – the end of 2017 marked the end of the sesquicentennial year. But the Canada 150 Rink on Parliament Hill in Ottawa is still going strong, while the cold weather lasts. I always do the traditional Ottawa thing, which is to skate on the Rideau Canal. I even skate to work when I can. The rink on Parliament Hill is unprecedented, though, and I had to make a point of getting a skate in, before it’s dismantled and gone for good.

Skating at the Canada 150 Rink is free, but you have to get a ticket – online, of course. I picked a beautiful, sunny, cold day for my skate. I don’t usually skate on ice surfaced with a Zamboni – I’m used to the rough surface of the canal. What a pleasure it was to skate around and around, looking at the East Block and the Centre Block of the Parliament Buildings. The music was a mix of English and French songs. The whole experience of skating on the Canada 150 Rink said: “Canada!”

Canada 150

Michael at Canada 150, Ottawa150 years ago the British North America Act made Canada a self-governing Dominion. There was a big celebration in Ottawa in 1867, and there was a big celebration in Ottawa in 2017. By the Good Fates I was born in Canada. I didn’t earn the privilege, but I do what I can to live up to it. I have lived in England and in Ukraine, worked all over the United States, and visited 38 other countries. Canada … my Canada … is the greatest country in the world.

Toronto Jazz Festival

Humber Student EnsembleThe Toronto Jazz Festival is being held at venues in Yorkville, and I’m hearing some wonderful music. Friday night, after work, I took in the Humber Student Ensemble on the Cumberland Street stage. These recent grads and students of Humber’s jazz program played a selection of standards: Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Errol Garner, Ray Noble, etc.. This is the kind of jazz I like. Doing a great job were Matt Lagan on sax, Chris Tufaro on piano, Julien Bradley-Combs on guitar, Emily Steinwall on sax, and Erik Larson on bass.

Dave Young/Terry Promane OctetThe Dave Young/Terry Promane Octet played on a stage on Yorkville Street on Saturday. This combo is a who’s who of Canadian jazz greats … veterans of the late Rob McConnell and his bands (the Boss Brass, the Tentet). Dave Young is playing bass, and Terry Promane is the horn player wearing sunglasses. They play the “Toronto sound” which is a blend of tight arrangements and virtuoso musicianship. Also in the Dave Young/Terry Promane Octet are Kevin Turcotte (trumpet/flugelhorn), Vern Dorge (alto saxophone), Mike Murley (tenor saxophone), Perry White (baritone saxophone), Gary Williamson (piano) and Terry Clarke (drums).

Lessons from the 1990s and Challenges for Canada-Ukraine Free Trade

Michael MacKay and Michael Kostiuk, UCPBA OttawaThe Ukrainian-Canadian Professional and Business Association, Ottawa branch, held a Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement Forum in Ottawa on June 10. Speakers at the forum were Michael MacKay (me) and Michael Kostiuk, pictured, as well as Ron Sorobey.

Here are notes from my presentation:

Canadians and Ukrainians can learn from the successes and failures of the first initiatives to advance civil society in Ukraine, after the resumption of Ukraine’s independence in 1991. Partners in Progress and the Canada-Ukraine Partners Project were Government of Canada initiatives which got started in 1992 and wound down in 1996. They placed Canadian volunteers with Ukrainian partners for projects in support of civil society. I was one of these volunteers, and my project partner was the University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy (UKMA). The goal of my project was to help UKMA achieve its foundational purpose: to become a self-governing academic institution and a peer to Western universities. Hundreds of Canadian volunteers fanned out across Ukraine, supported with small grants, in what was a period of excited enthusiasm for Ukraine free of the Soviet yoke.

The successes of Partners in Progress and the Canada-Ukraine Partners Project came from direct person-to-person interactions. Canadians extended their connections to Ukraine beyond what they had been, which were strictly family ties. Cultural ties were strengthened in the civil society space that lies between the family and the state. Ukrainians saw real civil society activism, and home-grown initiatives took off. Volunteerism broke free of its Soviet slave labour past. From the Canadians came an impetus for successes in Ukraine like professional associations, environmental groups, election monitoring organizations, and others.

The failure of these initiatives on the Canadian side was that they did not change Canada’s institutional, bureaucratic approach to foreign aid and emphasis on “development.” Canada did not come to treat Ukraine as a peer, and still does not. What the Canadian volunteers and their Ukrainian partners were doing did not stop what was really happening in Ukraine, which was a shift from statist authoritarianism to a hyper-inflationary kleptocracy. The power that civil society exerts on government and business remained something that existed in Canada, but not in Ukraine. Privatization was dishonest, the wealth of the nation was destroyed, and Russian imperialism kept its dead hand on the lives of Ukrainians.

Civil society is the foundation of the rule of law and the enforcement of contracts. It is essential to doing business in a fair market. The rise of the oligarchs in the 1990s in Ukraine and the re-theft of property that ensued, meant that honest business was impossible. Free trade was a dead issue in the 1990s and 2000s. It took the “Maidans” of 2004 and of 2013-14 for civil society in Ukraine to exert some power, and to make a free trade agreement between Canada and Ukraine possible.

The decommunization law which should have been passed in 1992 was passed in 2015, and is a great leap forward. This law is as essential to post-Soviet Ukraine as denazification laws were to post-Nazi Germany.

The challenge that lies ahead is that the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement is only a traditional deal eliminating tariffs on most goods and services. It needs to be “deep and comprehensive” like the combination of the EU-Ukraine DCFTA plus the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement to really make a difference to Canadians and Ukrainians.

Canada does not have visa-free reciprocity with Ukraine but the EU does; until Canadians meet Ukrainians in Canada as true peers there will be no trade boom coming from the Canada-Ukraine FTA. Ukrainians can travel without visas to all the countries in the EU Schengen Zone and to EFTA countries, but not to Canada. The Government of Canada disgraces itself and embarrasses Canadians by keeping up senseless and cruel barriers to Ukrainians.

Lustration in Ukraine has not reached the judiciary. Until corrupt judges are rooted out, there can be no confidence in the enforcement of contracts. Starting with Partners in Progress and the Canada-Ukraine Partners Project, Canada has had mentorship programs with Ukrainian judges. These need to become less polite, advisory, and “Canadian” and much more intimately tied to lustration and to the drive to eliminate corruption. Canada has been helping Ukraine transition from Soviet-style militia to Western-style police for law enforcement, but without honest judges in place all this effort will be for nought.

The IMF has pushed for an end to the moratorium on land sales. Honest enjoyment of property rights rests on clear and unambiguous title to land. You can only sell land if you truly own it. Theft of land in the Soviet period (collectivization) and theft of land in the oligarch period (1992 to EuroMaidan) means that land ownership is mostly illegitimate in Ukraine. Ukraine needs to extend decommunization to land ownership, and implement restoration and restitution to the original owners and to their heirs. The Baltic countries of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania have done this successfully. The laws of the Soviet Union, forced on Ukraine, are illegitimate on their face, and that applies to laws about land ownership, possession and use. After EuroMaidan, Ukraine is understanding itself as a country having recovered independence, from the 1918-1921 Republic, and not as having gained newly-found independence in 1991. The Soviet/Russian period was an interregnum. Land ownership and the enjoyment of property rights will only be on a firm foundation when it is tied to decommunization.

Canada has been fortunate to inherit political structures from Great Britain with a minimum of political violence. Ukraine has suffered appalling political violence from Russia. Ukrainians have to reach back further for examples of successful civil society, independence, and honest trade: to Kyivan Rus’, to the viche direct democratic assemblies, to the Ukrainian People’s Republic, to the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists and the Ukrainian Insurgent Army. Canada has had time to mature into an advanced democracy, not having suffered invasion since the Fenian Raids and the Battle of Ridgeway in 1866. Ukraine has been re-invaded by Russia starting in 2014. Ukrainians have the burden of defeating foreign invaders from Muscovy at the same time they’re establishing free trade with peer democracies like Canada.

There is formal free trade between Canada and Ukraine: the removal of tariffs and regulatory barriers. But peerage as nations and as peoples demands much, much more. We need to start by understanding that in this relationship Canada is the “Old Country” and Ukraine is the “Young Turk.”

For us Canadians, we have to keep supporting civil society and the rule of law in Ukraine, and we have to help liberate the occupied territories in Crimea and Donbas. It is incumbent on every Western nation, led in the vanguard by Ukraine, to defeat Russia. Only then will we have real free trade.Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement

Doors Open Ottawa, 2017

Exhibits at Parks Canada Sheffield Road Collections Storage FacilityDoors Open in Ottawa gets bigger and more popular every year, and it’s a challenge to visit new buildings and not wrestle with big crowds and long queues. Parks Canada opened the doors of its storage facility on Sheffield Road, a warehouse filled with exhibits and reproductions from historic sites. Here’s a table with an interesting sample of items: a rejected version of the Canadian flag, a pair of skates, a jacket from the destroyer HMCS Haida, and memorabilia related to Dr. Norman Bethune.

MiG 21, Canada Aviation and Space Museum, OttawaThe Canada Aviation and Space Museum is at the old RCAF Station Rockcliffe, and for Doors Open Ottawa the museum opened its reserve hangar. Inside are aircraft that are undergoing restoration or that just won’t fit into the limited space of the main exhibit hall. This is a MiG 21 fighter that was built in the Soviet Union and flown by the Czechoslovak Air Force. After the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Warsaw Pact, this airframe was acquired by the Canadian Armed Forces and came into the possession of the Aviation Museum.

Stadacona Hall, OttawaStadacona Hall in Sandy Hill was built in 1871 for lumber baron John A. Cameron. Canada’s first prime minister, Sir John A. Macdonald, lived here, and Lady Agnes Macdonald was famous for keeping peacocks on the grounds. Today, the mansion houses The High Commission of Brunei Darussalam in Canada.

Sir John A. Macdonald Building in Ottawa (former Bank of Montreal)The former Bank of Montreal building on the O’Connor Street block between Sparks Street and Wellington Street has been closed and under renovations for as long as I can remember. At last it’s open, as a House of Commons meeting or reception hall. First opened in 1932, the renovation kept the architectural features of the great banking hall.

Wellington Building in Ottawa (former Metropolitan Life Insurance Company)The former Metropolitan Life Insurance Company building on the same block has also undergone extensive, years-long renovations. Built between 1924 and 1927 in the Beaux-Arts style, original features that were kept were the building’s facade and the entrance hall off of Wellington Street that has an elaborate mosaic in the vaulted ceiling. The praise of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company was over-the-top: speaking of the Great Metropolitan Mother the mosaic proclaims: “Death and Disease Give Way Before Her.” Wow.

Michael in the witness seat, Wellington BuildingThis is me in the chair’s seat in a high-tech committee room. This can be said to be my proper and natural habitat. I’m not wearing a suit and tie, but I am wearing my Canada 150 t-shirt. 2017 is the sesquicentennial of the signing of the British North American Act and of Canada as a self-governing Dominion.

View of the West Block of the Parliament Buildings from the Wellington BuildingFinally, this is a view of the West Block of the Parliament Buildings, taken through a window of the Wellington Building. The Gothic Revival architecture of the Parliament Hill precinct in Canada’s capital is absolutely magnificent.